My Booking
Gentian House
  • Self Assessed 1 2 3 4

Countryside

Teesdale

Teesdale

Teesdale is one of the picturesque Durham Dales situated in the North Pennines. Historically the most northerly of the Yorkshire Dales, it is one of England's most sparsely populated rural regions and relatively undiscovered. The Teesdale Way, the Pennine Way and the Coast to Coast all pass through the dale's stunning scenery. You can explore picturesque villages, drive along quiet roads, walk and cycle for miles through magnificent scenery, sail or fish on Teesdale's reservoirs and rivers.

High Force Waterfall

High Force Waterfall

High Force is one of the most spectacular waterfalls in England. Located, 5 miles from Middleton in Teesdale, the river Tees drops 21 metres over the edge of the whin sill rock into a plunge pool below. A surfaced woodland path leads you from the car park to the base of the falls. The more adventurous can instead head down the steep steps to the left of the main entrance, crossing over the river by the footbridge before heading upstream to view the falls from the top on the Yorkshire side.

Low Force and Bowlees Visitor Centre

Low Force and Bowlees Visitor Centre

Situated amidst woodland near Low Force waterfall, and surrounded by rolling fields boasting some of the best hay meadows in England, Bowlees Visitor Centre has a café serving drinks, snacks and meals and a shop with booklets for self-guided walks, bike rides and nature-spotting. In holidays, the centre has a programme of craft sessions, nature workshops and family-friendly events. A short walk from the car park is Gibson’s cave, named after a 16th century outlaw who hid behind the waterfall.

Cauldron Snout

Cauldron Snout

Cauldron Snout is a waterfall on the upper reaches of the Tees, immediately below Cow Green Reservoir and upstream of High Force. It is a 200 yards (180 m) long cataract reckoned to be the longest waterfall in England. The falls are caused by the upper Tees passing over dolerite steps of the Whin Sill and the more adventurous visitor can clamber along rocks of its whole the length. There is a 2 mile (3km) walk from the free car park at Cow Green Reservoir.

The North Pennines Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty

The North Pennines Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty

The North Pennines Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty is one of England’s most special places –the stunning landscape of open heather moors and peatlands, attractive dales and hay meadows, upland rivers and woods contain reminders of a mining and industrial past, distinctive birds, animals and plants. The North Pennines is also a UNESCO Global Geopark – highlighting its globally important Earth heritage. It is one of the few places left in England where black grouse can still be seen.

The Teesdale Way

The Teesdale Way

The Teesdale Way follows the banks of the River Tees as it passes from the remote high moorlands of Cumbria and Durham to the industrial landscapes of Teeside and the coast. From Dufton it coincides with the Pennine Way National Trail, visiting High Cup Nick, Cauldron Snout and High Force before passing through Middleton-in-Teesdale and then Barnard Castle and the south of Darlington to the North-East coast at Warrenby, Redcar.

The Pennine Way

The Pennine Way

Probably the best known and toughest of the national trails, the Peninne Way runs 267 miles (429 km) from Edale, in the northern Derbyshire Peak District to Kirk Yetholm, just inside the Scottish border. The path runs along the Pennine hills, sometimes described as the "backbone of England" and passes along one of the most beautiful stretches of the river Tees from Middleton in Teesdale past Low Force, High Force and Cauldron Snout taking in some of the finest upland walking in England.

Hannah's Meadow

Hannah's Meadow

Once owned and farmed by Hannah Hauxwell, and now a Site of Special Scientific Interest, the Hannah's Meadow is considered to be some of the least improved and most species rich in upland Durham. Traditional hay meadow flowers, such as ragged robin, wood crane’s-bill, marsh-marigold, yellow-rattle, adders-tongue fern and globe-flower plus rare species such as frog orchid and moonwort can be seen and lapwing, skylark, redshank, curlew and meadow pipit, make their home in the pasture.

Hamsterley Forest

Hamsterley Forest

Hamsterley Forest is run by the Forestry Commission and is a delightful 2000 hectare forest covering the sides of a sheltered valley. Visitors can participate in wildlife watching, dark sky gazing, adventure play and mountain biking. The forest drive runs alongside Bedburn Beck and is dotted with places to park, picnic and paddle. At the main car park are a cycle hire facility, adventure playground, shop and cafe.

 
Scroll to top

Our website was created and is hosted by eviivo Limited, 154 Pentonville Road, London, N1 9JE, United Kingdom. Registration: 05002392 Tax / VAT number: 877374571 . eviivo have no responsibility for the content displayed on this website, and they operate the website on our behalf under the following privacy policy

By using this website you consent to our use of cookies and the terms of our privacy policy


More information